The Ur-Quan Masters Home Page Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
October 04, 2022, 12:17:06 am
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Paul & Fred have reached a settlement with Stardock!

+  The Ur-Quan Masters Discussion Forum
|-+  The Ur-Quan Masters Re-Release
| |-+  Starbase Café (Moderator: Death 999)
| | |-+  what is legal?
« previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Print
Author Topic: what is legal?  (Read 6155 times)
Deus Siddis
Enlightened
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1387



View Profile
Re: what is legal?
« Reply #15 on: May 04, 2006, 05:08:59 am »

Quote
And Sid. That very thought crossed my mind. Also, what happens if people use Spore as a creature design tool? I wonder how the EULA for Spore will look. More importantly, will you be able to do nude women creatures with bouncing breasts?

Hehe. I hope you can export the models you make, bones and all. It will be great to see Starflight, Wing Commander, Star Control, Star Wars, etc. ships, creatures and vehicles flying around in the Spore database. Crazy stuff.

About the nude women race and the like, I think they'll maybe have to attach one of those "Gameplay experience may change during online play" disclosures to their "T" ESRB rating. Smiley
Logged
Megagun
Enlightened
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 580


Moo


View Profile
Re: what is legal?
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2006, 12:19:07 pm »

If you're willing to spend the money, buy the audio of Caryl Shaw's at GDC, where she talks about the pollinated content and how it works, etc.. Pretty interesting stuff..

Anyways..
In Spore, you'll be able to mark a creature as "offensive content" or just mark it as "bad" (illegal). If 10 or more people have marked it as bad, it gets reviewed by a Maxis employee, and if it breaks any copyright or whatever, it gets removed from the database. When someone repeatadly uploads bad content, he or she gets his right to upload removed..

Also, everything you create with the ingame tools will probably be the sole property of Maxis or EA..

In addition, you want walking penis? Fine, as long as you don't upload it. You can create anything you want, but you can't upload everything you want....
Logged
Deus Siddis
Enlightened
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1387



View Profile
Re: what is legal?
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2006, 03:23:49 pm »

Quote
If 10 or more people have marked it as bad, it gets reviewed by a Maxis employee, and if it breaks any copyright or whatever, it gets removed from the database.

What if it is a care-bear?

I think they will have trouble keeping track of what content violates a copyright and what doesn't. There's also the issue that the masses of crazy people probably won't mark evil content as such, because they like to defend their cities with X-Wings and Battlemechs piloted by the aforementioned lipidous unclad womanoids.


Quote
Also, everything you create with the ingame tools will probably be the sole property of Maxis or EA.

Oow, you might be right. Then they can use us as free modelers or at least concept artists for their future products, those evil bastards. (que Imperial Deathmarch theme)


Quote
In addition, you want walking penis? Fine, as long as you don't upload it. You can create anything you want, but you can't upload everything you want....

But if your 8-year-old gets attacked by an army of said appendages, can you sue maxis for the psychological harm?


This sort of thing might get Jack Thompson rich(er) and Hillary Clinton elected. There's always been moding, but this will make it part of the core gameplay, in a massive way. It will be interesting to see how this aspect turns out, and if Maxis can keep up with the challenge.
Logged
Novus
Enlightened
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1938


Fot or not?


View Profile
Re: what is legal?
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2006, 05:59:56 pm »

I see, I suspected there was something along those lines (seems like a very judge-case-by-case law). Strangely there's no good translation of the word 'derivative' into Swedish (se:plagiat en:plagiarism maybe), I've just heard the English/American term for it every now and then.
"Derivative work" translates as "bearbetat verk", although the expression seems to be less common than the corresponding English one. The rules are pretty much the same in Sweden (and in Finland, where I live) as in the US. Plagiarism is, essentially, passing someone else's work off as your own, which usually involves both copyright violation and fraud.

Quote
Doesn't Trademarks also cover characters though? Mickey Mouse is not only Copyrighted, but also Trademarked and it doesn't seem to be just the name or °o° logo from what I can tell. When the Copyright period ends for a specific cartoon it will be public domain but the characters are still Trademarked (most likely forever, knowing Disney's zeal).
As long as Disney keeps selling Mickey Mouse stuff, I believe they can keep the trademark as long as they like (I haven't studied trademark law in much detail). However, using the trademark in conjunction with the original product should still be allowed. So, if I understand this correctly, when the first Mickey Mouse cartoons enter the public domain, you can duplicate them and sell them and whatever legally, but you can't make your own without violating the Mickey Mouse trademark (note, however, that trademark protection is only granted for specific forms of applications; Mickey Mouse-shaped potatoes may be OK).

Quote
And Sid. That very thought crossed my mind. Also, what happens if people use Spore as a creature design tool? I wonder how the EULA for Spore will look.
If I write a book in Word, can Microsoft dictate what I do with it? No. If I write a program in Visual C++, can they tell me how I may license it? No, except if I want to distribute their code (e.g. libraries) along with mine. The clincher here is whether your work includes some of their work or not, at least from a copyright point of view (things get really unclear when you use dynamic linking). End-user license agreements are a different kettle of fish, of course; it's unclear whether they are valid at all, and I've never heard of anyone being sued or prosecuted for violating one here in Finland. The problems with EULAs are that they are extra limitations forced on you after making a purchase and it is unclear whether clicking a button constitutes a legally binding way of agreeing to a contract. Personally, I'd say this makes EULAs a form of fraud and/or blackmail, but that is purely an opinion. Don't get me started on "Digital Rights Management" (or, more accurately, "Locking People Out From Doing Things They Paid For The Right To Do"); legally protected DRM makes EULAs look almost benign.
Logged

RTFM = Read the fine manual.
RTTFAQ = Read the Ur-Quan Masters Technical FAQ.
Halleck
Enlightened
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 750


Personal Text


View Profile WWW
Re: what is legal?
« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2006, 02:11:56 am »

The thing that's a bit different between spore and other content creation applications is that a good majority of the "creative work", or grunt work at least, will be performed by the computer. It will generate detail texturing, animation, etc. from proprietary maxis seeds and algorithms.

So... is your work "derivative" of maxis seeds?

I guess we'll find out when we go to install spore. My hope is that you retain authorship/copyright of your design, perhaps automatically granting maxis/ea a nonexclusive license to use it for any purpose.

What was done for stuff like the sims, where you had skins based on maxis base textures? Seems like a similar situation.
Logged


Currently working on: Going outside more

Game projects: Vega Strike / Elite Strike
Mugz the Sane
*Many bubbles*
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 159


need coffee...


View Profile
Re: what is legal?
« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2006, 08:03:23 am »

DRM is so damn evil that Satan has decided to retire and hand on the pitchfork.

And wtf is with this idiot randomly linking a bunch of crap?

Logged

I'm seriously considering going to Bali to paint nude women.
Pages: 1 [2] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!