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Author Topic: The decade when music died  (Read 6272 times)
SweetSassyMolassy
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Re: The decade when music died
« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2008, 10:45:14 pm »

Yep. With the huge number of bands that start up because of the internet, the really good bands are drowned out by the huge number of not so good ones. For that reason and because it's easier to over produce and edit bad music now more than it was in previous decades, pop music on the radio is getting worse and requiring less talent.
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lakota.james
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Re: The decade when music died
« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2008, 08:37:47 am »

I'm not sure how related this is to the topic, but I think Hannah Montana needs to be shot in the face. You can't walk into a store without seeing her stuff everywhere.
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countchocula86
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Re: The decade when music died
« Reply #17 on: August 21, 2008, 01:46:37 am »

Haha Miley Cyrus is a differant, but related issue.

Big companies like Disney can easily churn out all matter of crap with their latest star plastered all over it, which drowns out what other better but smaller people can manage.
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SweetSassyMolassy
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Re: The decade when music died
« Reply #18 on: August 21, 2008, 02:29:21 am »

maybe not shot in the face, just maimed a little
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Lukipela
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Re: The decade when music died
« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2008, 01:38:36 pm »

How do you maim someone "a little"?

In regards to music, I think it's the same trend you see everywhere. Big companies know what will sell, and the want to make money. So once something is a proven formula, they'll run it into the ground for as long as they can. After all, producing music today has become quite expensive, and they have shareholders to answer to.

While the music business has become a lot more monolithic and commercial than it was in earleir decades the main complaint you have really isn't anything new. It just means your old Smiley Old people always dislike whatever new-fangled crap the youngsters are listening to, and remember their own youth (and their own new-fangled crap) wistfully.  Your forebears probably weren't too fond of Nirvana or any other band you care to name.

But back to game music, which is much more enjoyable. Every now and then a game theme will find itself onto my playlist, and it's usually nice in a nostalgic way. I guess my main problem with game music is that I like lyrics, and they tend to not have them.
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Novus
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Re: The decade when music died
« Reply #20 on: August 21, 2008, 01:57:46 pm »

What, no mention of Stephane Picq's dune tracks? Try Morning Sunrise, Sekvence and Arakeen Palace, they were possibly the strongest aspect of that old game.
Stéphane Picq certainly produced some impressive Adlib music. I also recommend his KGB and MegaRace soundtracks.

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And as usual, the protoss are the best (reply 14 in that thread).
Blizzard has had several really good composers working for them; Gamespy interviewed three of them. Glenn Stafford is particularly interesting as he has done good work in a variety of styles on SNES (e.g. Lost Vikings 2), MIDI (e.g. Warcraft 2) and digital audio (e.g. Starcraft).

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How about all that great midi doom music (not doom 3)? I think it was just one composer, can't remember his name though.
Bobby Prince did an lot of quality music for id Software and Apogee (mostly Adlib, e.g. Commander Keen 4-6 and MIDI (e.g. Doom 1 and 2)).

I won't get started listing favourites, because that would take all day. We've only scratched the surface yet.
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SweetSassyMolassy
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Re: The decade when music died
« Reply #21 on: August 21, 2008, 02:01:30 pm »

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In regards to music, I think it's the same trend you see everywhere. Big companies know what will sell, and the want to make money. So once something is a proven formula, they'll run it into the ground for as long as they can. After all, producing music today has become quite expensive, and they have shareholders to answer to.
Producing music is pretty cheap compared to how expensive it was 30 years ago. That's why there's such a huge pool of artists to choose from. Making CDs and recording on the internet is so easy.

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While the music business has become a lot more monolithic and commercial than it was in earleir decades the main complaint you have really isn't anything new. It just means your old Smiley Old people always dislike whatever new-fangled crap the youngsters are listening to, and remember their own youth (and their own new-fangled crap) wistfully.  Your forebears probably weren't too fond of Nirvana or any other band you care to name.
But back to game music, which is much more enjoyable. Every now and then a game theme will find itself onto my playlist, and it's usually nice in a nostalgic way. I guess my main problem with game music is that I like lyrics, and they tend to not have them.
Although you're right about the old argument, nonetheless there never was a time when music had so little value. Except one time, and that was the disco era. Some disco artists had a lot of song writing talent though.
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Lukipela
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Re: The decade when music died
« Reply #22 on: August 21, 2008, 03:05:11 pm »

Producing music is pretty cheap compared to how expensive it was 30 years ago. That's why there's such a huge pool of artists to choose from. Making CDs and recording on the internet is so easy.

Oh I agree, producing music is cheap(ish). But when it's cheap and all sorts of folk can do it, you need to be really good at marketing, and that's expensive. And because people will only buy what they've heard about, you need to sink loads of money into this. Then there's the artists. Once someone starts selling well, you need to give them more and more money. The lifestyle of an star is becoming exponentially more expensive.

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Although you're right about the old argument, nonetheless there never was a time when music had so little value. Except one time, and that was the disco era. Some disco artists had a lot of song writing talent though.

I guess it's a question of quality and quantity? Back when it was hard to get out there you needed a good product. Now it's easy to get out so everyone is doing it, and many because they want to be famous rather than because they love their music. So it all comes down to who can shout the loudest, so to speak.
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SweetSassyMolassy
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Re: The decade when music died
« Reply #23 on: August 22, 2008, 12:45:41 am »

Oh I agree, producing music is cheap(ish). But when it's cheap and all sorts of folk can do it, you need to be really good at marketing, and that's expensive. And because people will only buy what they've heard about, you need to sink loads of money into this. Then there's the artists. Once someone starts selling well, you need to give them more and more money. The lifestyle of an star is becoming exponentially more expensive.

So unfortunate. And it's only adding to their ego, which adds to the problem.

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I guess it's a question of quality and quantity? Back when it was hard to get out there you needed a good product. Now it's easy to get out so everyone is doing it, and many because they want to be famous rather than because they love their music. So it all comes down to who can shout the loudest, so to speak.

Yes, exactly.
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