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Author Topic: Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?  (Read 3094 times)
Donkeybreath
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Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?
« on: August 21, 2003, 11:30:04 am »

Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?
The sun exploded in a huge super nova. SO WHY IS THERE STILL A SUN? Doesn't make any sense...
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Re: Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2003, 12:18:51 pm »

Actually, after a star goes supernova, the remaining material collapses into a small star- the star doesn't completely disappear.
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Re: Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2003, 01:19:22 pm »

Because they didn't make the sun explode, they simply punched a big hole in one of its outer layers. This resulted in a lot of instability, causing incredibly hot plasma to spew out in all directions. If the sun HAD gone supernova, it is unlikely that the hyperspace portal leading to Delta Gorno would even exist. This means not only could you not reach Delta Gorno, but neither could Tanaka or Katana. At least via Hyperspace anyhow...if you REALLY wanted to try to cover the Truespace distance, I'll see you in a few years. Wink
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Phasicsx
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Re: Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2003, 02:52:00 pm »

technically

a star that goes super nova will result in the formation of a black hole

a star that goes nova will result in the formation of a pulsar (a dense mass of neutrons)

and a star that becomes a red giant will eventually collaps into a white or even brown dwarf

it's all based on the orignial mass of the star



and if you really want to get technical

Super nova's are so massively poweful that if a star went super nova 10 light years away from our solar system when the eneergy wave finally got here it would annihilate every planet in the system. so you cn imagin what would be left of the planets in a solar system that had gone super nova

If you want an semi acurate exmaple of what a star going super nova will do get the game Freespace 2 and watch the ending moive, your get the idea that nothing not even matter  survives
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Re: Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2003, 08:35:27 pm »

Actually, there are several kinds of nova, some more devastating than others. One kind is where a black hole passes close to a star, causing it to shed a lot of mass, and exposing part of the core. This, without the black hole, may be most closely related to what happened to Delta Gorno.
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Re: Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2003, 03:58:28 am »

Quote: a star that goes nova will result in the formation of a pulsar (a dense mass of neutrons).

This is wrong, some stars have regular novas once every few million years. Don't believe me? See here: http://www.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/www_astro/gal/cv_beginners.html A pulsar or neutron star is created in a super nova when the star is not massive enough to form a black hole. If you don't believe me read about the crab nebula which is a super nova remnant and has a pulsar inside of it.

Quote: Super nova's are so massively poweful that if a star went super nova 10 light years away from our solar system when the eneergy wave finally got here it would annihilate every planet in the system.

Also wrong. It would not effect planets in a system 10 light years away.


Quote: If you want an semi acurate exmaple of what a star going super nova will do get the game Freespace 2 and watch the ending moive, your get the idea that nothing not even matter ¬ survives.

Wrong. Matter survives. It just gets redistributed in to a nebula.


Novae are now known to be caused by a star briefly re-igniting after having lain dormant for many years. Stars shine due to the nuclear fusion reactions in their cores, which process hydrogen into helium, releasing energy in the process. When the hydrogen is used up, sun-like stars slough off their outer envelopes, and become very small, very hot "white dwarfs." These white dwarfs are the inert cores of dead stars which have used up all of their available fuel. Now, stars often come in pairs, or "binaries," where two stars are in orbit around each other. If one of the stars in a binary is a white dwarf, and the other begins evolving into a red giant (a stage near the end of the life of a star, but before the white dwarf stage), the white dwarf can begin gravitationally attracting some of the gas from the atmosphere of the red giant to itself. Most of this gas will be hydrogen, and when the hydrogen reaches the surface of the incredibly hot white dwarf, it rapidly ignites, creating a large nuclear explosion on the surface of the star. This is what we see in our sky as a nova.

« Last Edit: August 22, 2003, 04:00:22 am by Orz_Brain » Logged

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Re: Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2003, 04:27:42 am »

What happens to a star after going super nova depends on how much mass the star has.  It could turn into a black hole if it has enough mas (or the star merges with another star), The most common I think is it turns into a smaller less hot star.  Also, it could turn into a neutron star (not a pulsar, I think a pulsar is a rare type of neutron star.
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Re: Why there is still a sun in Delta Gorno?
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2003, 05:30:54 am »

I think it turns into a "white dwarf", if my science textbooks are correct?

Like said above it could become a black hole too.
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